English

The English Department believes language is the primary means through which people define themselves and their world, that reading inspires empathy and compassion, and that effective written and spoken communication is an essential tool both for individual success and the positive transformation of society. Although each course has a unique emphasis (American Literature, World Literature, Narrative Forms, Modernism, etc.), the classes share a common goal: to foster students’ abilities to investigate and synthesize information and to express themselves effectively through written, oral, and artistic means. We require students to use their artistic talent in order to access and enter into dialog with texts and to make positive contributions to the school community and beyond.  At every level, students are engaged in various forms of spoken and written expression, media and textual analysis, problem solving and critical thinking. Our curriculum builds on itself, as students are guided toward language mastery that will set them up for success at OSA and beyond. We expect our students to:

  • Learn to read critically.
  • Be able to write clearly and creatively.
  • Develop effective speaking skills.
  • Comprehend and evaluate literal and implied meaning in multiple forms of expression and media (e.g. written, oral, multimedia).

English 6
Students read selected literature in several genres, including novels, short fiction, traditional literature, nonfiction, and poetry. Students learn reading strategies to enhance their comprehension. They develop their writing skills in the following genres: argument writing, literature response and analysis, narrative writing, and expository writing. They learn strategies for planning and organizing their writing, editing and revising their work. Listening and speaking strategies are emphasized during class discussions and oral presentations.

English 7
Students read a variety of texts, including novels, short fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students learn reading strategies and develop their writing skills in the following genres: argument writing, literature response and analysis, narrative writing, and expository writing. Vocabulary study focuses on academic language and Greek and Latin roots. Listening and speaking strategies, including collegial discussion techniques, are emphasized during class discussions and oral presentations.

English 8
Students read a variety of texts, including novels, short fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students learn reading strategies and develop their writing skills in the following genres: argument writing, literature response and analysis, narrative writing, reflective writing, expository writing, and poetry. Vocabulary study focuses academic language and the history and origins of the English language. Listening and speaking strategies, including collegial discussion techniques, are emphasized during class discussions, oral presentations, and Socratic seminars.

English 9
In this class, you’ll learn to use language as an artistic and social tool. You will be challenged to examine your community and beliefs, and grow as a reader, writer, and thinker. We’ll be exploring many things about our world, especially how people use language to influence others and tell the human story. It will be difficult, but it will also be fun. Welcome to the journey!

English 10
Students read a variety of texts, including novels, short fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students learn reading strategies and develop their writing skills in the following genres: argument writing, literature response and analysis, narrative writing, reflective writing, expository writing, and poetry. Vocabulary study focuses academic language and the history and origins of the English language. Listening and speaking strategies, including collegial discussion techniques, are emphasized during class discussions, oral presentations, and Socratic seminars.

English 12
Students read a variety of texts, including novels, short fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students learn reading strategies and develop their writing skills in the following genres: argument writing, literature response and analysis, narrative writing, reflective writing, expository writing, and poetry. Vocabulary study focuses academic language and the history and origins of the English language. Listening and speaking strategies, including collegial discussion techniques, are emphasized during class discussions, oral presentations, and Socratic seminars.

English III
In keeping with OSA’s tradition of high academic standards, this course engages students with classic literary texts in order to prepare you for the English Literature course offered senior year and in college. Through our study of these works, which are representative of every genre, you will learn how sophisticated readers use analysis to develop a deeper understanding of the text.

Honors English 12
Students read a variety of texts, including novels, short fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students learn reading strategies and develop their writing skills in the following genres: argument writing, literature response and analysis, narrative writing, reflective writing, expository writing, and poetry. Vocabulary study focuses academic language and the history and origins of the English language. Listening and speaking strategies, including collegial discussion techniques, are emphasized during class discussions, oral presentations, and Socratic seminars.

AP Literature & Composition
Students in this college-level English course read and carefully analyze a broad and challenging range of nonfiction and fiction prose selections, deepening their awareness of how language works in effectively communicating an idea. Through close reading and frequent formal and informal writing, students develop their ability to work with language and text with a greater awareness of purpose and strategy, while strengthening their own writing abilities. The purpose of this course is to promote critical thinking and writing. Multiple modes of instruction and informational materials ranging from film clips to speech writing will be incorporated to enrich student recognition, comprehension, and execution of rhetorical analysis. The expectation and rigor of this course will therefore be high and the workload challenging.

Elective: Creative Writing 
Students read a variety of texts, including novels, short fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students learn reading strategies and develop their writing skills in the following genres: argument writing, literature response and analysis, narrative writing, reflective writing, expository writing, and poetry. Vocabulary study focuses academic language and the history and origins of the English language. Listening and speaking strategies, including collegial discussion techniques, are emphasized during class discussions, oral presentations, and Socratic seminars.